2022 Dad Vail Program

83R D A N N UA L Jefferson DadVail Regatta Friday, May 13–Saturday, May 14, 2022 Philadelphia, PA | Schuylkill River

College of Architecture and the Built Environment College of Health Professions College of Humanities and Sciences College of Life Sciences – Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences College of Nursing College of Pharmacy College of Population Health College of Rehabilitation Sciences Kanbar College of Design, Engineering and Commerce – School of Business – School of Design and Engineering School of Continuing and Professional Studies Sidney Kimmel Medical College Ten colleges and four schools comprise our National Doctoral Research University that offers 200+ academic programs— everything from traditional undergraduate programs to programs for professionals who want to advance their careers. Redefining Humanly Possible— Thomas Jefferson University

It’s a pleasure to welcome you back to one of Philadelphia’s great athletic events! The 2022 Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta is a wonderful opportunity–both to appreciate sports competition at its best and to celebrate the joy of gathering together in a beautiful location. Thomas Jefferson University is pleased to once again be the title sponsor of this Philadelphia tradition. We salute the individual athletes who are daring to test their strength, skill and stamina in the Regatta. The Jefferson community is daring, too: Daring to ask the big, important questions of the 21st century–and daring to answer them–through research and discovery, teaching and learning, caring and healing. We see a kindred spirit in the daring and dedicated women and men who will row the waters of the Schuylkill in this year’s Regatta. We wish them (including our own Jefferson Rams!) the very best. Mark L. Tykocinski, MD Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Thomas Jefferson University to the Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta! ARCHITECTURE | BUSINESS | DESIGN | ENGINEERING | FASHION & TEXTILES | HEALTH | MEDICINE | NURSING | SCIENCE | SOCIAL SCIENCE

May 13, 2022 When the world’s best collegiate rowers are on the Schuylkill River, that’s how we know it’s Spring in Philadelphia! Welcome to the one-and-only Dad Vail Regatta. On behalf of everyone at Independence Blue Cross, we’re proud to support the Dad Vail and the competition, sportsmanship, and athleticism on display. As Philadelphia’s hometown health insurer, we love to shine a light on people living healthy, active lifestyles. Just as our company has stood with our community to face the challenges of COVID-19, I know that the rowing community has had to dig deep to preserve its traditions and keep boats on the water. We salute the rowers, the coaches, the administrators, and everyone who works on behalf of this great sport. I hope that everyone who comes to town for the Dad Vail gets to experience some of the hospitality and history that Philadelphia has to offer. And you’re always welcome back! Here’s to a great weekend! Gregory E. Deavens President and CEO Independence Blue Cross

Welcome LETTER OF

• • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ONE PARKWAY BUILDING • 1 51 5 ARCH STREET, 1 0TH FLOOR • PHILADELPHIA, PA 1 91 02 www.phila.gov/parksandrecreation Kathryn Ott Lovell Philadelphia Parks & Recreation Commissioner May 2022 Dear Friends of the Dad Vail Regatta: Philadelphia Parks & Recreation is proud to welcome you to the 2022 Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta, presented by Independence Blue Cross, Coca-Cola, and PECO. The Dad Vail Regetta is a gem in the crown of our City’s sporting traditions, and marks the unofficial start of the summer season here in Philadelphia. As the largest intercollegiate rowing competition in North America, the Dad Vail Regatta is an incredible opportunity for our City to host so many universities and colleges and athletes and fans. The Schuylkill River and the rowing clubs that make up Boathouse Row are integral to the history of the City of Philadelphia. We are thrilled to welcome the fans, new and returning, to enjoy this legendary boat race along the banks of our City’s most storied waterway. As stewards of the Schuylkill and the 2,000 acres of parkland that surround it, Philadelphia Parks & Recreation is dedicated to protecting the river while providing memorable riverfront experiences to residents and visitors. We are grateful to the Dad Vail Regatta Organizing Committee for its vision and leadership in hosting a world class regatta on the Schuylkill each year, and to the event sponsors who demonstrate a continued commitment to high quality events that celebrate the best of Philadelphia’s public spaces. We welcome and applaud the athletes, coaches, and spectators whose energy and dedication will make the 2022 Dad Vail Regatta memorable for all who attend. Finally, thank you to the countless volunteers who clean and maintain the condition of the park after such a popular and well attended event. Enjoy the regatta, and we hope you have the opportunity to explore Philadelphia’s legendary park system during your visit. Sincerely,

We’re on a mission to improve the health and well-being of our community. Whether at work, at home, or at play, it’s been the driving force behind everything we do — for more than 80 years. We are a proud sponsor of the Dad Vail Regatta, and wish the best of luck to all the teams! ibx.com

DAD VAIL REGATTA ORGANIZING COMMITTEE OFFICERS JOHN R. GALLOWAY Chairman JAMES R. HANNA President KEVIN F. BACKE Vice President PATRICK MCCANN Vice President JOHN F. LEONARD Regatta Secretary PATRICIA A. WINTON Recording Secretary THOMAS G. DELUTIS Treasurer DIRECTORS JOHNR. GALLOWAY, Chairman KEVIN F. BACKE BRIAN A. BAPTISTE WILLIAM BRADSHAW KEVIN DAVIS THOMAS G. DELUTIS DON DIJULIA LARRY DOUGHERTY JAMES R. HANNA WILLIAM K. JURGENS, JR. MORRIE LEDWITH JOHN F. LEONARD JAMIE L. S. LINDSAY ASIYA MAHMUD PATRICK MCCANN LOU MCCORMICK GREGORY MONTANARO KIRSTEN MORASCO JOSEPH MURPHY M.D. JOHN J. MUSIAL BRADEN J. NEGAARD CHRISTOPHER L. O’BRIEN, JR. LAUREN M. VIDAS PATRICIA A. WINTON ADVISORY BOARD JILL BODENSTEINER WILLIAM E. MIFFLIN DENIS O’BRIEN STEPHAN M. ROSENFELD VINCENT SZYMKOWSKI REGATTA MANAGERS PERRY HAMILTON General Manager JOHN MUSIAL Chief Referee KATE GODWIN Co-Chief Referee CHRISTA MUSIAL Director of Registration MARY LEDWITH Chief Medical Official MORRIE LEDWITH Dock Master Director TRICIA WINTON Director of Volunteers AWARDS AND RECOGNITION KIRSTEN MORASCO KATE MORRO NOLEN MORASCO AINSLEY MORASCO KRIS POPP RIVER MARSHALS JOHN LEONARD DAVE KACALA USROWING REFEREES JOHN MUSIAL Chief Referee KATE GODWIN Co-Chief Referee THE JURY JIM KALKRENNER RICH DOUGERT DENNIS STREEBEL PAUL CAPUTO DAN HARMON JOE MANION JOE KIEFFER DAN SWARTLEY MCCARDLE JOAN SHOLL RUTH MACNAMARA ZORY SALES LEEANNE DILUCCA CINDY WHITEHEAD HAL JOHNSON ED FAGAN JOHN QUINN ROM RORER MIKE MURPHY NIKOLA VAJDA JORGE SALAS TONY DENOFA JOHN KOWAL DENNIS SMITH MICHAELA CAMPBELL LORRAINE BALZER CHRIS LAWSON ANNOUNCERS LOU MCCORMICK Finish Line Tower GERRY PATERSON Lane Assignments and Results TOM O’KEEFE Lane Assignments and Results FRANK KEEGAN Lane Assignments and Results CASEY BAKER Color Analyst BRAD NEGAARD Color Analyst ANNETTE NEGAARD Assistant to Announcers BILL JURGENS Live Streaming Committee REGATTA OPERATIONS KEVIN BACKE PAT MCCANN MORRIE LEDWITH JOHN MUSIAL KIRSTEN MORASCO CHRIS O’BRIEN JOHN LEONARD JEFFERSON DAD VAIL REGATTA PROGRAM PRODUCER STUART FRANKS WEB SITE MANAGER JON BERNSTEIN JUDGES AT FINISH BOB CLARKE LOU MCCORMICK, III LAUNCH AREA MORRIE LEDWITH JACK CONLIN JOHN JUGLER DIANE GODOROV PROVISIONS/ HOSPITALITY KATIE BACKE KAREN O’BRIEN KRIS PROPP PRESS RELATIONS ED LEVIN SOCIAL MEDIA MEGAN THEDINGA PHOTOGRAPHY JIM AULENBACK TRAFFIC/PARKING CONTROL ED HOLLAND GEORGE BAUMGARDNER TED BAUMGARDNER JOHN CALLOGHAN RESULTS DEBBIE CORNATZER REGISTRATION CHRISTA MUSIAL KAT MUSIAL JUDY KAPLOW TIMING SYSTEM JASON MOODY STREAMING VIDEO FIVE TRIBES CINEMA PRODUCTIONS COLIN STEWART DIRECTORS OF VOLUNTEERS KATHLEEN MADDEN TRICIA WINTON WEATHER MONITORS SHELLY CASTORINO TOM DELUTIS IT CONSULTANT DAVE KEPHART THE COACHES COMMITTEE KHALED SANAD (CHAIR) GREGG HARTSUFF JOHN BANCHERI CHRIS O’BRIEN ANTHONY CHACON (Secretary and IT helper) SPECIAL THANKS TO JOE BRIGHT, ESQ. ROWAMERICA ALL THE VOLUNTEERS FOR THEIR TIME REGATTAOfficials f

© PECO Energy Company, 2019 At PECO, our employees invest thousands of volunteer hours and we contribute more than $6 million each year to help our communities grow and prosper. We also champion efforts that impact education, the environment, arts and culture, and community enrichment. PECO is a proud supporter of the 2022 Dad Vail Regatta.

American University Crew Team Jorge Galindo Barry University Emily Stasi Boston University Women’s Crew Malcolm Doldron Bowdoin College Doug Welling Bryant University Steph Ricker Bryn Mawr College Carol Bower Buffalo State College Alexis Jordan Cabrini University Tim Hagan CarnegieMellon University Rowing Club Indra Periwal Case Western Reserve University Chester Spartan Catholic University of America Katie O’Driscoll Clarkson University Crew Club Boris Jukic Colgate University Rowing Khaled Sanad Detroit Boat Club Crew Stephen Malbouef Dominican College Ivan Rudolph-Shabinsky Drexel University Paul Savell D’Youville College Michael Cote Embry Riddle Aeronautical University Dan Schenk Fairfield University Rowing David Patterson Florida Institute Technology Adam Thorstad Jim Granger Fordham University Nick Chwalkowski Franklin & Marshall Robert Brady Geneseo Crew Club Kathleen Rebban George Washington University Nate Goodman Georgetown University Kendall Mulligan Georgia Tech Rowing Club Gayatri Menon Gordon College Madeline Hopkins Grand Valley State University Rowing Club Dan Martin Iona College Crew John Boyd Jacksonville University Rowing Mike Lane Jefferson University Chris O’Brien LaSalle University Ivo Krakic Lafayette College Crew Club Rick Kelliher Loyola University Rowing Megan Patrick Manhattan College Alexander Canale Karla Ward

Marietta College Abby Klicker Greg Myhr Massachusetts Institute of Technology Claire Martin-Doyle Will Oliver Mercyhurst University Adrian Spracklen Merrimack College Andrew Finch Milwaukee School of Engineering Charles Stollenwerk Nazareth College Emily Farrar New York University Crew Joanne Victorio Oklahoma City University Rowing Cory Conzemius Penn State Crew Zach How Princeton University Paul Rassam Purdue University Nathan Walker Rollins College Crew Shawn Pistor Rutgers University Men’s Crew Stephen Wagner Simmons College Jennifer Thomas St. Joseph’s University Mike Irwin St. Mary’s College of Maryland Anna Lindgren-Steicher Stetson University Crew Jamie Francis Stockton University John Rosado Temple University Brian Perkins The College of New Jersey Crew Timothy Nerveza Tulane University Rowing Association John Huppi U. S. Merchant Marine Academy Derek Hartwick U. S. Military Academy Crew Tom Babbitt University of Colorado Crew Roman Sammartino University of Connecticut Jennifer Sanford University of Delaware Men’s Crew Chuck Crawford Aaron Schnell University of Pittsburgh Jacquelyn Rice University of Rhode Island Tim Nesselrodt University of St. Thomas Jonathan Buchert University of Tampa Bill Dunlap University of Vermont Frances Stripp University of Wisconsin Bebe Bryans Villanova Wildcat Rowing Association Carissa Adams Virginia Tech Crew Thomas Foltz Washington College Will McLean Kari Hughes

We’re right around the corner. And always in yours. For nearly 200 years, WSFS Bank has stood for one thing: Service. We’re committed to doing what’s right and helping the communities where we live, work and play. That’s why we’re honored to support the Dad Vail Regatta. Member FDIC | wsfsbank.com

1. Jefferson University 2. LaSalle University 3. Drexel University 4. Temple University 5. Rollins College Crew 6. Marietta College 7. University of Delaware Men’s Crew 8. Jacksonville University Rowing 9. University of Connecticut 10. Fairfield University Rowing 11. Penn State Crew Alumni 12. U.S. Coast Guard Academy 13. Fordham University 14. George Washington University 15. Case Western Reserve University Crew Team Alumni TENTS A i

The Dad Vail Regatta Organizing Committee established “Friends of the Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta,” a membership supported endeavor, to rally both long-time and new fans of North America’s largest collegiate rowing regatta. Friends of the Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta accept financial gifts from individuals and groups to strengthen the financial underpinnings of an unparalleled rowing tradition that began in 1934 and has become an iconic Philadelphia event. To join the Friends of the Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta and make a financial gift, go to www.dadvail.org and click on the Donate Now button. Become a Friend of the JEFFERSON DAD VAIL REGATTA

Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta LLP is proud to support the

Dad Vail Regatta Organizing Committee SAFESPORT POLICY Effective as of January1, 2015 Condensed SafeSport Policy (For Entire Policy and Program See Website www.dadvail.org) DVROC’s SafeSport program is designed to insure athlete safety and promote an environment free from six forms of prohibited conduct to include actual or alleged bullying, hazing, harassment (including sexual harassment), emotional misconduct, physical misconduct and sexual misconduct (including child sexual abuse). REPORTING AN INCIDENT Any person who has been a party to, or witness to any one or more of the six prohibited acts of misconduct shall prepare a written report and deliver a copy to two DVROC Officials at two, separate meetings. DVROC Officials, who can be recognized by their Gold colored jackets, circulate throughout the Regatta on Thursday, Friday and Saturday of the Regatta weekend. All reports shall always be treated as confidential, shall be clearly marked as confidential, shall contain the name of the person who prepared the report, and the date and time of the alleged incident, the name(s) of the victim(s), the specific prohibition which has been violated, and the date and time the report has been provided to each of the two DVROC Official, as well as the printed and signed name of the two DVROC Officials who received copies of the report. A record of all information shall be maintained by the victim or the victim’s advocate. Due to the sensitive nature of any reported alleged incident, circulation shall be strictly limited to those parties with a specific “need to know.” For final disposition of any alleged incident, DVROC Officials will refer the matter to, and furnish the subject report to the Chief Referee who is always a US Rowing Licensed Referee, who shall be responsible to follow appropriate incident reporting receipt of any report to the President of DVROC, who shall assume for responsibility for providing notification to the proper authorities. In the event of an emergency or there exists a need for anonymity, hot line phone numbers follow: 610.952.4293 – DVROC, President, J.R, Hanna 610.213.0939 – DVROC, Board Member, Kirsten Ledwith Morasco DRONE RULE Permission to use any drone at the Dad Vail Regatta must be approved, in writing, in advance of the first day of the Regatta, by DVROC and by the Chief Referee. Anyone seeking to operate a drone at the Dad Vail Regatta must petition for permission prior to the event. This petition shall include times, area of operation, operator name and contact information as well as the specific location from where the drone shall be operated. Any drone operating at the Regatta without proper approval will be grounded. The crew associated with the outlaw drone may be penalized. CAPSIZE RULE Any crew that capsizes in the marshalling area, starting line or while racing will not be permitted to compete. If a crew capsizes while rowing to the start (outside the marshalling area) they will be permitted to compete provided all of the athletes and the related equipment are deemed to be in good condition. No races will be delayed due to a capsize event. Capsize and Drone Rules Capsize Rule Any crew that capsizes in the marshalling area, starting line or while racing will be Drone Rule Permission to use any drone at the Dad Vail Regatta must be approved, in writing, in advance of the rst day of the Regatta, by DVROC and by the Chief Referee. Anyone seeking to operate a drone at the Dad Vail Regatta must petition for permission prior to the event. is petition shall include times, area of operation, operator name and contact information as well as the speci c location from where the drone shall be operated. Any dr ne operating at the Regatta without proper approval will be grounded. e crew associated with the outlaw drone may be penalized.

Harry Emerson Vail, a former rower, captain (1892-93) and assistant coach at Harvard for seven years, was hired at Wisconsin after E. R. Sweetland, former Cornell rower, resigned after only three winter months on the job. Vail immediately made an impact on the Badger rowers, as chronicled by the Wisconsin State Journal of March 11, 1911, “All of the crew men like the strapping giant, who peels o his citizen clothes and gets into the gym suit to show them how to operate an oar in a shell.” A year later, Vail's varsity placed second to Cornell by only three seconds over four miles at the Poughkeepsie Regatta. Over the summer of 1914, the UWmedical faculty and the Athletic Council decided to ban crew as causing an enlarged heart and therefore being a danger to the athletes. Vail a nationally known sculler and coach, was therefore forced to bide his time at Wisconsin and wait ten more years before returning to the Hudson to compete again in the Poughkeepsie Regatta. His perseverance kept a national crew perspective at Madison. Later studies proved the heart, a muscle, enlarges like any other exercised muscle, and that rowers showed a lower risk of premature death over their lifetimes than non-athletes. During this period, crew became a club sport for some of the years and, after the ban was removed for the 1920-21 season, returned to shortcourse races against other colleges for the balance of the years. Vail is credited by all for maintaining a campus spirit for the sport of crew and for helping to bring it back to varsity status in the early 1920's. e truth is, crew would probably have never died completely, given the inherent advantages to the sport on a Madison campus situated between two large lakes. In 1924, Vail returned to the Hudson River and his varsity eight again took 2nd place at the Poughkeepsie Regatta. During the 1920's, Vail would host opposing crews and coaches that would touch him or Wisconsin in later years. Future Wisconsin coaches-Washington rowers Mike Murphy and Norm Sonju, rowed in Madison in the 1920's against Vail-coached Wisconsin crews. Washington Coach “Rusty” Callow (later a Penn and, nally, the Navy head crew coach)visited Madison with his crews in 1927 and was so moved by Vail's warmth, humor and humility, that he would later initiate, in 1934, the rst “Dad” Vail trophy in a regatta that later o cially became the “Dad” Vail Regatta. It is today the largest collegiate regatta in the nation, attracting men's and women's Division II crews and new crew programs from Division I colleges. When “Dad” Vail died in his native Canada in 1928, Wisconsin State Journal Sports Editor, Henry J. McCormick, who rowed for Vail, wrote of his mentor's death, he “never had a more abiding a ection for anyone” than he felt for Vail. Meet “Dad” Vail

MARIETTA COLLEGE’S 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF ROWING 1871-2021: THE LITTLE DAVID OF COLLEGE ROWING 46 DAD VAIL CHAMPIONSHIPS AND GROWING In 2021, Marietta College is celebrating the 150th Anniversary of rowing on the Muskingum and Ohio Rivers. In 1871, a student-driven initiative to introduce the sport of rowing on campus was accomplished. There was no athletic department and there were no coaches — just plain student interest in one of the most popular professional and collegiate sports at that time. One has to give the students credit for organizing and fundraising to get the program up and running, but there were issues facing the program. There was no boathouse — not a great thing for wooden boats — and by 1874, interest in the program waned, the equipment fell into disrepair and the underclassmen who proceeded the class of 1871 did not have the same zeal for the sport. By 1875, there was no rowing at Marietta. The Pioneer spirit did not wane, however, and by 1876, the sport was re-established — this time as the Marietta College Rowing Association with a new Boathouse and renewed interest in the sport. By 1881, the College was fielding a total of six fouroared shells. There was unequivocal confidence the Marietta Navy would become not only the leading sport on campus, but one of the top programs in the West. In 1877, Marietta College and the Duquesne University Rowing Club held the first-ever race on the Ohio River. The crews raced 2 ½ miles with Marietta claiming victory. Unfortunately, the Marietta Navy once again could not sustain interest in the sport. Sadly, due to lack of competition, by 1891 rowing was no longer a sport on campus; the midOhio Valley would have to wait another 35 years before the program was resurrected. In 1925 a committee was appointed to evaluate the prospects of reestablishing shell racing as a Marietta College sport. This time, unlike the other attempts, the timing was right, and the program would become an integral part of the College and community. The College allocated the necessary resources and were fortunate to receive shells from the University of Washington and University of Pennsylvania. Importantly, the College started negotiations with the University of Washington for a crew coach. The College felt it would be best to follow the popular trend of colleges hiring former Husky rowers to coach their teams. In fact, nine of the 13 rowing coaches at the collegiate level were graduates from Washington’s rowing program. The Washington powers that be recommended to Marietta that they hire J. Ellis MacDonald, a ’29 graduate and stroke of the 1927-29 Washington Varsity. Upon arriving in Marietta ’29 MacDonald went to work to create excitement, and most importantly, find willing and able men to become part of his team. The ’29-30 season would be inter-class and intramural racing. MacDonald had his sights set to field a crew to be competitive with the Goliath’s of college rowing. The “Little David of College Rowing” was ready to go. MacDonald, like Marietta’s current coach Greg Myhr, had no problem going up against the top crews in the country. All in all, the College held its own. While MacDonald’s Marietta crew would never beat the Huskies head-to-head, they did give them a scare during a dual race in 1931. The year of 1934 will go down in the chronicles of Marietta rowing as one of its most significant years. This is largely thanks to the foresight of Rusty Callow, then the Coach of University of Pennsylvania, who promoted the idea of rowing championships for schools “too small” to compete with the “big boys.” Hence the “Dad Vail Cup” was first competed in 1934 with Marietta defeating Rutgers and Manhattan to win the first Dad Vail Regatta. It would take another 29 years before Marietta would capture Dad Vail Varsity Heavyweight Gold. Marietta is proud to have been one of the founding members of the Dad Vail Rowing Association that was formed in January 1939. Of the eight founding member schools, only Marietta and Rollins College remain regular participants. Under the leadership of Ralph Lindamood who coached Marietta from 1960 – 1984, Marietta was a dominating force during the 60’s and 70’s — winning the Varsity Heavyweight 8 in 1963, 1966, and 1967. In 1967, Marietta swept the Dad Vail Regatta winning all three of the Heavyweight 8 races. Between the Men and Women’s program the program has won 46 Dad Vail Championships, in the following Categories:

The Dad Vail Room at the Lindamood-Van Voorhis Boathouse displaying names of all alumni and crews that have won Dad Vail Gold. MEN’S PROGRAM • VARSITY HWT 8: 1934, 1963, 1966, 1967, and 2006. Marietta lost the 1964 Dad Vail to Northeastern University. The 1967 Boat competed in the Ratezburg, Germany and Henley Royal Regattas. • VARSITY LWT 8: 1971,1973, and 1994. Marietta won the inaugural event in 1971. • JV HWT 8: 1966, 1968,1969,1971,1972,1973,1976, and 2002. The Rusty Callow Cup was retired upon winningthe event three years in a row. • FRESHMAN/NOVICE HWT: 1964, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1973, 1976, 1978, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004, and2012. The Lev Brett Bowl was retired in 1971 upon winning the event three years in a row. • VARSITY HWT 4: 1981 • FRESHMAN/NOVICE HWT 4: 1980, 1983, 1992 • VARSITY PAIR W/COX: 1990 and 1991 • FRESHMAN/NOVICE LWT 8: 1976, 1983, 1991 WOMEN’S PROGRAM • DIVISION 3 OPEN VARSITY 8: 2004, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015 • VARSITY LIGHTWEIGHT 4: 1993, 1996 MedalistMuch has changed in the 82 years the Dad Vail has been contested. Marietta College rowing has embraced the growth changes made to the Dad Vail allowing both Club and Varsity programs, regardless of the enrollment, to compete for the coveted Dad Vail Gold. While it is a challenge for a school with an enrollment of less than 1400 students, the College has recommitted itself to be a Dad Vail school and a consistent presence in Grand Finals and the medal podium. Over the past 5 years, the College leadership, dedicated alumni, and friends of the Pioneer Navy have funded a $1.3 million renovation to the Lindamood – Van Voorhis Boathouse, updated its fleet of racing shells and small boats, and are on track to raise a $5 million endowment for the Men’s and Women’s Rowing teams. The 46 banners of crews that have won Dad Vail gold that hang from the Boathouse rafters in the Dad Vail Room is an inspiration to each new member of the Men’s and Women’s Rowing programs. Under the leadership of the Men’s Head Coach Greg Myhr and Women’s Head Coach Abby Lord, Marietta is prepared and excited for the next 150 years at the Dad Vail. Marietta College Varsity 8-First Crew to win Dad Vail Regatta. • Varsity Lwt 8: 1971,1973, and 1994. Marietta won the inaugural event in 1971. Marietta College Varsity 8-First Crew to win Dad Vail Regatta 1973 Dad Vail Winning Varsity Lightweight 8 1973 Dad Vail Winning Varsity Lightweight 8. • Varsity Lwt 8: 1971,1973, and 1994. Marietta won the inaugural event in 1971. Marietta College Varsity 8-First Crew to win Dad Vail Regatta 1973 Dad Vail Winning Varsity Lightweight 8 1971 Junior Varsity Heavyweight 8. • JV Hwt 8: 1966, 1968,1969,1971,1972,1973,1976, and 2002. The Rusty Callow Cup was retired upon win the event three years in a row. • Freshman/Novice Hwt: 1964, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1973, 1976, 1978, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2012. The Lev Brett Bowl was retired in 1971 upon winning the event three years in a row. • Varsity Hwt 4: 1981 • Freshman/Novice Hwt 4: 1980, 1983, 1992 • Varsity Pair w/cox: 1990 and 1991 • Freshman/Novice Lwt 8: 1976, 1983, 1991 1971 Junior Varsity Hwt 8 1976 Marietta Freshman Dad Vail Winners 1976 Marietta Freshman Dad Vail Winners. • JV Hwt 8: 1966, 1968,1969,1971,1972,1973,1976, and 2002. The Rusty Callow Cup was retired upon winn the event three years in a row. • Freshman/Novice Hwt: 1964, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1973, 1976, 1978, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004, a 2012. The Lev Brett Bowl was retired in 1971 upon winning he event three years in a row. • Varsity Hwt 4: 1981 • Freshman/Novice Hwt 4: 1980, 1983, 1992 • Varsity Pair w/cox: 1990 and 1991 • Freshman/Novice Lwt 8: 1976, 1983, 1991 1971 Junior Varsity Hwt 8 1976 Marietta Freshman Dad Vail Winners Women’s Lightweight 4+ 1993 Dad Vail Gold Medalist. WOMEN’S PROGRAM • Division 3 Open Varsity 8: 2004, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015 • Varsity lightweight 4: 1993, 1996 omen’s light weight 4+ 1993 Dad Vail Gold Medalist 2004 Women’s Varsity D2/D3 Heavyweight 8+ Dad Vail Gold Medalist Much has changed in the 82 years the Dad Vail has been contested. Marietta College rowing has embraced the growth changes made to the Dad Vail allowing both Club and Varsity programs, regardless of the enrollment, to co pete for the coveted Dad Vail Gold. While it is a challenge for a school with an enrollment of less than 1400 students, the College has recommitted itself to be a Dad Vail school and a consistent presence in Grand Finals and the medal podium. Over the past 5 years, the College leadership, dedicated alumni, and friends of the Pioneer Navy have funded a $1.3 milli n renovation to the Lindamood – Van Voorhis Boathouse, updated its fleet of racing shells and small boats, and are on track to raise a $5 million endowment for the Men’s and Women’s Rowing teams. The 46 banners of crews that have won Dad Vail gold that hang from the Boathouse rafters in the Dad Vail Room is an inspiration to eac new member of the Men’s and Women’s Rowing programs. Under the leadership of the Men’s Head Coach Greg Myhr and Women’s Head Coach Abby Lord, Marietta is prepared and excited for the next 150 years at the Dad Vail. GRAM Open Varsity 8: 2004, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015 htweight 4: 1993, 1996 men’s light weight 4+ 1993 Dad Vail Gold Medalist 2004 Women’s Varsity D2/D3 Heavyweight 8+ Dad Vail Gold Medalist in the 82 years the Dad Vail has been contested. Marietta College rowing has embraced s made to the Dad Vail allowing both Club and Varsity programs, regardless of the mpete for the coveted Dad Vail Gold. While it is a challenge for a school with an nrollment students, the College has recommitted itself to be a Dad Vail school and a consistent Finals and the medal podium. ars, the College leadership, dedicated alumni, and friends of the Pioneer Navy have funded vation to the Lindamood – Van Voorhis Boathouse, updated its fleet of racing shells and re on track to raise a $5 million endowmen for the Men’s and Women’s Rowing teams. The ws that have won Dad Vail gold that hang from the Boathouse rafters in the Dad Vail Room each new member of the Men’s and Women’s Rowing programs. Under the leadership of oach Greg Myhr and Women’s Head Coach Abby Lord, Marietta is prepared and excited for at the Dad V il. 2004 Women’s Varsity D2/D3 Heavyweight 8+ Dad Vail Gold Medalist.

By Ed Levin Philadelphia – The Temple Men’s Crew program is synonymous with success at the Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta. Owners of 21 Gold Medals in the Varsity Heavyweight Race throughout the 82-year history of the event, the Owls rowed into history again at the 2021 Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta, presented by Independence Blue Cross, PECO and Coca Cola. Though the pandemic limited the number of teams participating in the 2021 regatta, the field of Varsity Eight Heavyweight Men was stacked with talent. But the Temple Owls were up for the challenge. To make history they would have to get by a talented field that included local rival Drexel who were hot on Temple’s heels and seemed to get faster every time the two raced. George Washington University had just been cut as a varsity team and were extremely motivated on going out on top and then there was Colgate, the reigning champs in the race. Knowing the pace would be fast, the three boats got off the line quickly and continued that pace throughout with each of the three boats trading strokes. As they approached the final 500 meters, the three teams pushed each other to the limit with the Owls holding on to earn the victory with a record setting time of 5:29, narrowly beating George Washington who finished second with a time of 5:30. “Winning last year was a surreal experience,” said junior Kenneth Raynor, who rowed in the three seat last year. “As a boat we meshed well, and just trusted that our coxswain would make the correct calls when needed. The welcome we got on the dock after rowing back upriver was when it really hit home; the entire team was there to celebrate with us.” Coach Brian Perkins added, “To win the Varsity Heavyweight Eight in 2021 felt great. They were great guys, many of whom were granted a fifth year of covid eligibility so they were super veteran. We reminded them every day of what a blessing and opportunity it was to even be able to row and compete after having a year ripped away from them. They gelled pretty early and despite differences in opinion and approach, had a shared goal of Dad Vail '21.” The victory in the premier event gave the Owls their second victory in the past three years the event was held and helped Temple clinch the Men’s Overall Point Trophy for the first time in school history. Perkins said, “In 2019 we put every single athlete on Temple Crew into a Dad Vail final but we did not place high enough to win the point trophy. We felt like we could do that again and maybe chip away at the point trophy and I am super proud of the men for getting it done. We even had a guy come back from an injury and "point" for us in the single. So it really was a team effort and the team supported each other like never before. There are not many things that I can call long time Temple coach Gavin White and say "Hey! Look what we did!" but this is definitely one of them.” With a memorable season behind them, Temple has plenty of work to do if they want to repeat as champions. Returning only two rowers from last year’s boat gives Perkins a chance to re-invent Temple crew that will feature youthful energy. With 75% of the roster being relatively new to collegiate racing there were bumps in the road, but it was fun as the young racers were able to get acclimated to new surroundings. “Our Fall was a lot of fun despite the issues that Hurricane Ida caused,” said Raynor. “We spent a lot of time indoors but when we got onto the water it was back our standard morning routine. At the moment we are taking every day as it comes, and the focus is mainly on what challenges need to be overcome when we next get back in our boats.” TEMPLEMen’s Crew Continues To Row Into History At Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta

The Jefferson Dad Vail is in its 83rd year and going strong. As programs across the country rebound after the pandemic, this regatta continues to serve as a sense of normalcy amongst the collegiate rowing community. This 83rd year also bears significance as it will mark the fourth time para rowers will be competing on this prestigious course. Since 2018, these events have seen athletes of all classifications traverse the Schuylkill, further instilling the notion that para racing belongs on the collegiate stage. Gracing the waters in 2021, was Caleb Bresley of Gordon Rowing Association, John Doughty of Philadelphia Adaptive Rowing, in addition to Madison Eberhard and Andrew Mangan of West Side Rowing Club. Their participation, in tandem with the on-going support of the Jefferson Dad Vail, continues to challenge the barriers and stigmas that exist within the world of collegiate athletics. While the goal is to have other largescale regattas follow suit, there is also a call for narratives to be rewritten when thinking about para rowing as a whole. The strokes may look different, but make no mistake — this sport commands the same respect, effort, and dedication from all its athletes. As 2022 welcomes some new and returning competitors, one thing remains unchanged in spite of every hurdle — Dad Vail continues to honor competitive para rowing through its unwavering pursuit of sport equality. By Taylor Roberts, Coordinator of Para Rowing for the Dad Vail Regatta Para Rowing at the Dad Vail Regatta Caleb Bresley Maddy Eberhard, John Doughty, & Andrew Mangan

In the fall of 2006, Thomas Jefferson University set out to recruit its inaugural women’s rowing team. Forty one enthusiastic students came forward, hoping to be part of this historic crew. A few weeks into training, the coaches scheduled a 5-mile outdoor run … for 5:30 a.m. That dark morning, shortly after they began running, it started to pour. Head Coach Chris O’Brien remembers thinking, “This will make some people think twice about whether they really want to do this. Surely, some will quit.” The next day, all 41 showed up again. Only two of them had rowed before, but what the Rams lacked in experience they made up for in grit and determination. Not wanting to turn away the dedicated student-athletes, O’Brien put all 41 on the team–even though the school only owned 12 rowing machines, four eight-oared boats and four sets of oars. Boathouse Row was fully occupied, so the Rams signed a lease at Whitemarsh Boat Club in Conshohocken, about a half-hour away. They shared the facility– which had been converted from an industrial warehouse–with 10 other colleges and high schools. After just one year of competing, the Rams Women’s Novice 8 won their event at the 2007 Dad Vail Regatta. It was the first time in the Dad Vail’s 73-year history that a first-year program won a gold medal in the category. That early taste of victory was just the beginning of the success the program would see. The institution has become a regular at the NCAA DII Championships, making the cut in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2015 and 2019, and finishing as high as third place. It has produced six All-Americans, who earned the honor a total of nine times: Magdalena Dzierzanowski and Renee Rozaieski in 2010; Mary Swings into its 15th DadVail Regatta RAMSROWING

Costello, who joined the team as a walk-on, in 2012, 2013 and 2014; Amy Robinson in 2014 and 2015; Eliza Brooks in 2015; and Maxi Schacht, who did so as a first-year student, in 2019. And the Rams have excelled in the classroom as well as on the water. In the program’s 16 years, active team members’ cumulative GPA has always been 3.25 or higher, and 36 crew members have received “All- Academic” awards from the Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association. The past several years have brought substantial changes to the program: In the spring of 2016, the crew moved into Crescent Boat Club on Philadelphia’s famed Boathouse Row; and in 2017, Philadelphia University merged with Thomas Jefferson University, adopting the latter’s name. Through it all, the program has continued to grow its young but mighty legacy. Siblings of the team’s alumnae now follow in their sisters’ footsteps, like Hannah Tobinus ’21 and Rachael Tobinus ’18, and MaryAnn Saad ’23 and Martina Saad ’19. Crew members hail from across the United States and from countries like Spain, Germany and Lithuania. And every spring, the Rams harness their grit and determination to compete in the Dad Vail Regatta.

Catering - Gift Cards - Take Out 4266 Main Street Philadelphia, PA 19127 215.487.2663 www.winniesmanayunk.com Now serving Brunch everyday until 3pm!

A national research doctoral university formed by one of the nation’s most innovative and successful mergers (Thomas Jefferson University + Philadelphia University), Jefferson is a professions-focused, global institution located in the heart of Philadelphia. We bring unrivaled innovation and discovery to higher education and prepare students for the future of work. How? Through high-stakes projects that cross industries and continents. Through a trademarked approach to education—Nexus Learning™—that shatters silos and cultivates collaboration. Through a Creativity Core Curriculum and design-thinking mentality at both the undergraduate and graduate levels in a variety of fields, including medicine, architecture, business, design, engineering, health, science, fashion, textiles, nursing and the social sciences. At Thomas Jefferson University, we know that the only constant is change. Employers and industries of tomorrow will need professionals with seemingly impossible skill sets: The ability to anticipate the unknown. A formidable set of power skills that stand the test of time and work across disciplines. Visionaries with relentless creativity, agility and curiosity–Jefferson graduates! ARCHITECTURE • BUSINESS • DESIGN • ENGINEERING • FASHION & TEXTILES • HEALTH • MEDICINE • NURSING • SCIENCE • SOCIAL SCIENCE

No matter what students study at Jefferson, Nexus Learning is at the core of their academic experience. Nexus Learning is powered by action, collaboration, real-world situations and in-demand liberal arts skills. From working with students across majors to identifying and solving problems for Verizon or NASA to responding to national crises. From leading-edge equipment to mastering the art of intellectual risk-taking and learning that is borderless. Our goal is to make students not only successful, but iconic. What is Nexus Learning™? Magic happens when students work across disciplines to solve industry challenges. For example, our industrial design, engineering and business students come together every year to develop new products for automotive components manufacturer Tenneco. COLLABORATIVE Our Hallmarks Program empowers students to reach their full potential by teaching them to: • Question assumptions with rigorous inquiry and critical analysis. • Adapt to new challenges with contextual communication and global perspectives. • Contribute with intercultural insight and collaborative creation. • Act with confidence grounded in intellectual risk- taking and ethical reflection. THE LIBERAL ARTS Our students meet with congressional staff members in Washington, D.C.; win the World Sneaker Championship for an innovative shoe design; and design futuristic cities of 2050. ACTIVE Jefferson students log thousands of hours at COVID-19 vaccination sites; study fashion in Paris, global economics in Havana and biomimicry in Costa Rica; and help our neighbors register to vote and access absentee ballots for the presidential election. REAL-WORLD

Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta Provides Excitement For Philadelphia, PA – Boston University Lightweight women’s coach Malcom Doldron could not contain his excitement when recently asked about his team’s upcoming trip to the Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta, co-presented by Independence Blue Cross, PECO and Coca-Cola. The 83rd annual Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta will be held on Friday, May 13 and Saturday, May 14 on the historic Schuylkill River. “We can’t wait to return to the Schuylkill,” said Doldron in a recent phone interview. “The Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta has become a rite of passage for our team. It is a great event and really gets us prepared for the IRA National Championship Regatta. We get to see lots of speedy crews and get to come down the course multiple times, so I feel it’s an added advantage in our preparation.” “I am really excited to have a chance to once again compete at the Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta,” said senior Karsen Healy, who attended Mount St. Joseph’s Academy located in suburban Philadelphia and raced on the Schuylkill River countless times during high school. “Being a senior and having a chance to show most of the team how special it is to race in Philadelphia is an exciting time.” “This is a special event, and it will be so exciting to race in front of a big crowd who supports all of the racers,” Healy added. Since deciding to add the Jefferson Dad Vail Regatta to the schedule four years ago, the Terriers have experienced much success winning gold in both the lightweight Varsity Eight and the Heavyweight Varsity Eight. After winning the gold in the Heavyweight Eight in 2019, the Terriers were very much looking forward to defending their title. Unfortunately, they did not get the chance due to the COVID – 19 pandemic forcing the cancellation of the event in 2020. The Terriers wanted to attend last year however travel restrictions did not allow them to make the trip down. With everything starting to turn back to the way things operated prior to the pandemic, Boston U. will be making a long-awaited return. With the event a little less than two weeks away, Doldron is excited about the way his team has come together and waded through a difficult transition of establishing the long-standing team culture. “We had a solid fall season,” Doldron said. “But a slower start than expected due to it being the first semester of relative normalcy was since the beginning of the pandemic. Our athletes were overwhelmed and over stimulated early on and just needed time to setting down. Once we remembered what it was like to train and race as a team, they all bought back into the process and remembered who we are as a program. We’ve been moving quite well ever since.” Healy added, “This year has been great. We have established a great team culture and we are full steam ahead. We are excited to be able to travel and the team has a great spirit and energy.” boston university

255YEARS AGO By Claire Savage The banks of the Schuylkill River roared with 10-15 thousand spectators on Saturday, May 10, 1997. The Temple Owls sought to claim their ninth consecutive Dad Vail Regatta victory in the Men’s Heavyweight Eight. The Owls were prepared to repeat history, and the history was that Temple was going to win. The 1997 varsity eight boat treated the historic race as a business. The 1996 boat had kept the streak alive by sailing to an eighth-straight Dad Vail title. The Owls had the pressure to keep the winning streak alive and to maintain Temple’s legacy Despite figuring out the boat’s chemistry throughout the season, the 1997 crew were ready to rise to the occasion. Made up of Steven Panzik, Peter Gergo III, John Clark, Kevin Gross, Igor Francetic, Brendan Duke, Nathan Swick, Jason Read, and coxswain Reade Palmer, the crew was blended together from different nations. The crew was composed of members from Canada, Ireland, Croatia, and the United States. The young boat had a mix of youthful energy, racing experience, and attitude. This was the race that Temple wanted to win in front of their home crowd, and they had their eyes set on the bigger picture. The crew was aiming to figure out their identity throughout the season but by the end of the season they were moving as fast as a Temple boat had moved at that point. Palmer, the coxswain of the crew, transferred to Temple for his sophomore year. He melded together the different backgrounds and personalities of the crew. Palmer was a natural leader who had standards, and with that came requirements. He laid down the mission to the crew and they came down the racecourse ready to attack. Maintaining the streak of the Dad Vail Championships was the standard. Generations of guys who won the first Dad Vail stood there waiting and expected the crew to win. It wasn’t the pressure to win, it the pressure not to lose. The relationship between the coxswain and stroke seat is unmatched. “An intense bond develops between you and the coxswain,” remembered Read. “He had the ability to pull the words that I was thinking out of me and articulate them to the crew.” This skill allowed the Owls to hook and send the shell simultaneously. The chatter and talk leading up to the race added pressure to the crew. “I think you're foolish if you don't have a little bit of nerves when you step up to that line,” said senior bow seat and captain Panzik. “Once that first stroke went off there wasn't a doubt in my mind that there was no way the streak was going end with us.” Temple laid down the rhythm of the boat from start to finish, and they had no doubt in their mind that they were going to win. “All I thought about was that it was never enough, we couldn’t win by enough”, said Read. “The Schuylkill is our home venue and we wanted to be the fastest boat on the Schuylkill regardless of what lead we were in. We wanted to be the fastest eight and we were.” The Owls picked off the race strong and confident. “All we knew was to pull and go”, said Panzik. They got out and stayed out and never looked back. The crew pressed through the foot plates and hung every ounce of bodyweight on the end of their blade from start to finish. Florida Tech tried to push their bow ball ahead, but it was too late. The Owls crossed the finish line five seconds ahead of Florida Tech, and the entire boat took a deep sigh of relief. “It was a huge weight off of our shoulders when we crossed that finish line”, said Gergo III. They did it. They kept the streak alive. Although Panzik went on to take his last strokes in his Temple uni, he would go on to set Temple up for what would become the longest winning streak in the Men’s Heavyweight Eight at the Dad Vail Regatta. Whether it was the pressure, or the comradery between the crew, the outcome was the same, Temple takes the title. Again. We Couldn’t Win By Enough

By 1996 the Temple Men’s Varsity 8 had set up a tradition of winning at the Dad Vails. But the streaks only added pressure to the team to continue to find ways to win at the regatta held on their home course. “What happens with whenever Gavin is coaching a boat is you find your stride at the right time of the year and that was at the Dad Vail. So, he had us running and running fast come Dad Vails and the boat was clicking,” Dan McGuinn, who rowed the five seat, said. “It was a perfect blend on the boat of youth and experience.” The preparation from the coaching staff down through the team was echoed by other rowers. “It was really always up to us to make sure that we capitalized on our potential,” said Kevin Gross, the four-seat who would later serve as an assistant coach. “So, what happens is Coach Gavin had an amazing ability to keep you sharp but rested come Dad Vails,” McGuinn said. For years the Temple men’s team had a streak of winning the Dad Vails. However, that did not provide a cushion of comfort for the rowers. “Temple, you know, we were a dominant crew and when you're a dominant crew, it's hard to keep up the intensity because the risk is a little higher each year that you're going to be expected to win. You know there's somebody out there trying to take that away from you,” McGuinn said. Come regatta weekend the preparation paid off. Despite the Men’s Varsity 8 boats having to row on Sunday due to thunderstorms right before the last races on the second day the teams returned to the Schuylkill River focused and reassured in their preparation. “So, for us it was like ‘We got to do this the next day. We got to do it tomorrow morning.’ So, we came down, we raced, and we won. It was a testament to all the work we put in the year before,” McGuinn said. The Owls not only won on Sunday, they pulled away from second place George Mason by two boat lengths. Delaware, which lodged a protest claiming Temple had bumped them under the Strawberry Mansion bridge, came in third. “It was a little stressful for a while, but I had not doubt about the outcome,” said White after the race. “I was more concerned about the guys. They had been on the water a long time.” “All the hard work and training and preparation pays off,” Gross said. Besides McGuinn and Gross, the winning boat was comprised of Bruce Tran (coxswain), Matt Garbut (stroke), Nate Swick (7 seat), Shawn Reid (6 seat), Igor Francetic (3 seat), Albie Wachlin (2 seat) and Steve Panzik (bow). Twenty-five years later the 1996 rowers still remember the Dad Vails and their time at Temple fondly. “We set up a Temple way of rowing which is just a little different than everyone and there's a certain edge to what we do, and we wear that with pride,” McGuinn said. By Ann Rejrat 25YEARS AGO The Temple University Men’s Crew Team Reflects On Their Dad Vail Win

RkJQdWJsaXNoZXIy NzA2NDY0